Announcing Our New ACOs: 30 Rural Health Systems Participating In Six ACOs In Nine States In 2015

This is a proud day for the National Rural ACO.  Today, we issued a news release about our new ACOs.  Read on and you’ll see why we are so excited.

The National Rural ACO announced today it has successfully formed five additional ACOs in 2015 for rural providers following in the steps of the first ACO started in 2014. Using the organization’s unique collaborative model, fifty-two entities, including 28 rural and critical access hospitals, 42 rural health clinics, 12 federally qualified health centers and 9 private physician practices in thirty rural health systems were able to afford and qualify for the Medicare Shared Savings Program. More than 65,000 attributed Medicare beneficiaries from the states of Texas, California, Washington, Iowa, Indiana, Missouri, Oregon, Illinois and Michigan are now benefitting from the program under the care of 1,300 clinicians.

Our newest ACOs are:

  • National Rural ACO
  • Reid ACO, Suburban Health ACO
  • American Rural ACO
  • Northwest Rural ACO
  • National Rural ACO II

In almost all cases, the rural hospital sponsored the program and invited local providers to join at no charge. Although annual revenue for the hospitals ranged from $5 million to $758 million per year, and they all included employed or contracted physicians, only one applicant had enough beneficiaries to form its own ACO. All of the others joined forces to achieve the minimum number of beneficiaries and to reduce the cost of participation in proportion to what rural providers can expect to earn from the program.

The National Rural ACO provides comprehensive services including claims data access and analysis, evidence-based medicine leadership, care coordination coaching and the governance, legal and compliance services needed to succeed.

“The National Rural ACO’s unique model of collaboration is the first of its kind to enable rural providers to receive higher reimbursement for improving the care they deliver,” said Tim Putnam, CEO of Margaret Mary Hospital and chair of the board for the first National Rural ACO. “We can access the same type of powerful data, waivers and programs that urban ACOs can for about the same cost as it would be to hire one person to figure out how to get into the program.”

Please contact us if you would like more information about our new ACOs.